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Some Kid Facts

What's for Lunch?

 

1940s Children's  Birthday Parties
Children of all ages have their special food tastes which should be considered when planning parties
(1946) ALL children love parties. They can be fun, too, for the mother who is hostess — providing she plans them carefully. A wise mother will not plan a party for a child so small that he cannot feed himself, nor will she plan one at any hour which might interfere with a child's afternoon nap. So as not to disrupt food schedules, it is better that parties for children between the ages of four and six be held at the usual luncheon or supper hours and refreshments should consist of simple, easy-to-prepare and easy-to-serve foods. A simple menu for a "small fry" birthday party to be given in the afternoon might consist of midget peanut butter sandwiches, or any other small not-too sweet sandwich, cut into fancy shapes; ice cream served in paper cups and individual birthday cakes. These can be cupcakes, each with its own lighted candle. Children love them, but adults should stand by until each light is blown out. Hard candies in bright colored paper baskets make nice favors for such a party. A second menu for four-to sixers, but more appropriate for lunch time, consists of crisp bacon slices, whipped potatoes, buttered carrots, ice cream and Sunshine birthday cake, a recipe for which follows: Sunshine Birthday Cake Recipe.

YOU can use more freedom in planning party menus for children between the ages of six and ten. For a simple little get-together, for instance, a complete menu might consist of two kinds of sandwiches — sliced cheese and minced ham. The cheese should be a mild one, such as the processed American cheese, and you could vary the minced ham sandwiches by adding chopped hard - cooked eggs. If you do not serve ice cream, you might prepare a molded gelatin dessert, plain or with fruit added, and. of course, to accompany it, a batch of your favorite cookies. Sugar cookies are best and they can be cut into paper doll and cowboy forms for variety. Steaming hot cocoa will top this simple meal very nicely. For a more elaborate birthday luncheon, the following menu will make a hit with any group of pre teen agers.
1946 Birthday Party Menu for pre teen agers.
The popcorn balls' recipe for which follows, can be wrapped in waxed paper and tied with gaily-colored ribbons for take-home favors.
3 Dots - Separator

TEEN-AGERS not only can find plenty of excuses for a party, but they usually can be counted on to do a considerable share of the planning and preparation. It's well to remember, however, that children of this age have enormous appetites so, while the food may be simple, there should be lots of it. Hamburgers or hot dogs, as the piece de resistance never fail to please the youngsters, and all you need to accompany them are a few relishes and a nice dessert. You might, for instance, serve olives, pickles, carrot sticks and potato chips along with hamburgers on buns, and top all off with chocolate whipped cream cupcakes and a milk shake, or you might provide assorted sandwiches with similar relishes and wind up with ice cream sodas and butterscotch refrigerator cookies. Recipes for both the cupcakes and the cookies follow.

Source: Post Standard, Syracuse, NY -April 21, 1946

 

Below is a 1941 newspaper advertisement for baby food - although at first glance it looked more like an article - and does not state that it is an ad! Then it goes on to tell our 1940s mothers to feed their babies their sugary food right off the bat - because babies will like it! Duh...

Babies Love Rennet-Custard Milk Desserts - 1941
It's really thrilling to see babies begin to eat rennet-custards, one of the first semi-solid foods which many doctors recommend. How they do love to eat milk from a spoon! And milk is so much more delicious in dessert form! Easier to digest, too, because of the rennet enzyme.

These eggless, non-cooked rennet custards are grand desserts for busy mothers-so quick and easy to make. Start your baby on rennet-custards made with "Junket" Rennet Tablets, making a bland rennet-custard at first, and gradually adding more flavor and sweetening as baby gets older. At grocers and druggists. (1941)
Product Picture - Rennet Custard Milk Dessert, Bowl and Spoon.

* * *

"Mrs. Jerome Pope, the most recent resident, wrote from Dallas where she and Mr. Pope, and son, Jay are living with their parents waiting for a house to be vacated so that they again can establish their own home. The Popes came to Wellington and bought a home while Lt. Pope was stationed at the Childress Army Air Field. They made many friends here during, the two years they lived in Wellington. Mr. Pope, an attorney, is now associated with his brother and father in a law firm in Dallas. Their son, Jay, now weighs 20 pounds and Mrs. Pope says he has learned some respect for a switch." The Wellington Leader Thurs., Dec. 13, 1945

SURVEY OF THE DECADES - CHILDREN & FAMILY

Raising Children in the 1940s

What was it like to have children in the 1940s? What was it like to be a kid in the 1940s?

"A baby is born somewhere in the United States every 8,76 seconds."
The News and Tribune, Jefferson City, Missouri, 1947
Vicks Vaporus - Best-Known remedy for relieving miseries or children’s colds.

Best-Known home remedy for relieving miseries or children's colds. Vicks Vaporus.  Dixon Evening Telegraph January, 1947
 

1945 Children's Play Clothes

 

Play Clothes

Even the most rugged brother and sister team can indulge in a tug of war without embarrassing results in the short overalls and square-neck pinafore shown above. (to the left)



 

1945 Girl's Dress: Red Hearts On Corduroy


Red Hearts On Corduroy

Charming Christmas gift for the teens is shown.

Gray corduroy is brightened by bright-red embroidered hearts at the waist and on the pockets.

 

 

 

PUPIL LUNCH PRICE UP

COST IN CITY SCHOOLS TO 20 CENTS SOON

When Word Is Received of Exhaustion of State Allotment, Pupils Must Pay 5 Cents More.

The cost of living is about to hit the pocket money of some 30.000 public school boys and girls here, including many who can't yet spell "increased" but do know what a nickel is.

They are the Kansas City pupils who eat lunch at school, and they are a part of about 8 million pupils over the nation who will be affected by the Department of Agriculture announcement today that it would be powerless to provide further assistance for hot school lunches unless Congress votes additional funds. ...

In Kansas City 28,000 to 30,000 pupils a day are eating in the school lunchrooms and cafeterias, where they can buy a balanced plate lunch for 15 cents. The actual cost is 24 cents, reduced a 9-cent government subsidy...

Excerpt from: The Kansas City Star, Kansas City, Missouri, February 28th 1947

SMA PREPARES TO BROADEN SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM

State Department Of Social Welfare Will Handle Food Distribution

SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 13. -Surplus Marketing Administration officials today looked forward to broadening the school lunch program which last year served 4,700,000 children throughout the nation. Estimates have been prepared showing that at least 8,000,000 school children come from homes with, incomes too small to afford them complete and well balanced diet.

Excerpt from: The Modesto Bee And News-Herald, Modesto, California, August 13th, 1941

Children and The War

1942 Paper Delivery Boy

"Their regular job is delivering this newspaper to thousands of homes daily. But now these loyal young Americans have volunteered to take on an extra job . . . that of taking your order for 10¢ Defense Savings Stamps and delivering the number specified to your home regularly each week, You pay the carrier when he delivers the stamps to you, making it easy for you to do your part in national defense. 1942 Paper Boy Taking Defense Stamp Orders

To those who ask, "What can I do to help in the present emergency?" the Government answers, "Make the continued purchase of Defense Savings Stamps a regular part of your budget. Start now to invest in the future safety of your country." Thus, acting as Official U. S. Defense Agent in the sale of 10¢ Defense Stamps, your carrier, is cooperating with the Government - without profit or remuneration. "

Toys Burned Catholic Daughters of America are having a toy shower for St. Michael's Orphanage at their next meeting, Thursday, Dec. 13, 1945. Because some of St. Michael's children were stricken with polio most of the toys, including story books, color books and dolls, had to be burned. The Catholic Daughters will endeavor to replenish the supply at the December shower at the KC club. The CDA's pre-holiday tea has been postponed indefinitely. THE LA CROSSE TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY EVENING, -DECEMBER 5, 1945

What's My Name?

1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s
Top Baby Names of 1940
  • 1.  James,   Mary
  • 2.  Robert,   Barbara
  • 3.  John,   Patricia
  • 4.  William,   Judith
  • 5.  Richard,   Betty
  • Top Baby Names of 1941
  • 1.  James,   Mary
  • 2.  Robert,   Barbara
  • 3.  John,   Patricia
  • 4.  William,   Carol
  • 5.  Richard,   Linda
  • Top Baby Names of 1942
  • 1.  James,   Mary
  • 2.  Robert,   Barbara
  • 3.  John,   Patricia
  • 4.  William,   Linda
  • 5.  Richard,   Carol
  • Top Baby Names of 1943
  • 1.  James,   Mary
  • 2.  Robert,   Barbara
  • 3.  John,   Patricia
  • 4.  William,   Linda
  • 5.  Richard,   Carol
  • Top Baby Names of 1944
  • 1.  James,   Mary
  • 2.  Robert,   Barbara
  • 3.  John,   Linda
  • 4.  William,   Patricia
  • 5.  Richard,   Carol
  • Top Baby Names of 1945
  • 1.  James,   Mary
  • 2.  Robert,   Linda
  • 3.  John,   Barbara
  • 4.  William,   Patricia
  • 5.  Richard,   Carol
  • Top Baby Names of 1946
  • 1.  James,   Mary
  • 2.  Robert,   Linda
  • 3.  John,   Patricia
  • 4.  William,   Barbara
  • 5.  Richard,   Carol
  • Top Baby Names of 1947
  • 1.  James,   Linda
  • 2.  Robert,   Mary
  • 3.  John,   Patricia
  • 4.  William,   Barbara
  • 5.  Richard,   Sandra
  • Top Baby Names of 1948
  • 1.  James,   Linda
  • 2.  Robert,   Mary
  • 3.  John,   Barbara
  • 4.  William,   Patricia
  • 5.  David,   Susan
  • Top Baby Names of 1949
  • 1.  James,   Linda
  • 2.  Robert,   Mary
  • 3.  John,   Patricia
  • 4.  William,   Barbara
  • 5.  Michael,   Susan


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  • Source: Social Security Online
  • 1944 - Mentally Deficient Child Is Happier In An Institution

    I just don't know how I would act if I had a child severely handicapped mentally. I think I know how I ought to act, and what my attitude toward the problem ought to be. But being human, like other people, I might not look at the matter in a way as reasonable as I think I can now.

    You and I know some parents of such children, who are very intelligent in other areas, but who in respect to the mentally defective child seem to be utterly unreasonable. A certain mother of a boy of twelve, only about five years old mentally, cannot be persuaded to put that boy into an institution. There he could be made comfortable and, socially and mentally, could have better education than any home could provide. The parents would be relieved of his care, and they and the other children of the family, of the continuous, unspeakable embarrassment in relation to him.

    Think of what the presence of such a child means to the family. What a cloud, on his account, forever hovers over them. The parents cannot nearly do their best at work or play, and the normal brothers and sisters are hindered as nobody else can know.

    But this loving, gracious, self-denying mother always answers: "He is my boy; he is one of our family. We owe it to him to keep him always with us and to minister to him at any personal sacrifice."

    It is not the mentally handicapped child who suffers most; but his loved ones, particularly the mother; and my heart hurts for her.

    There are private institutions, small and homey, which would afford this child what the best homes cannot. And what a weight they take off the mother's neck. There the other children, much like him, accept him as one of their social group and he is happy; whereas at home, all the children of the neighborhood, except those much younger, perhaps, tease and treat him as a fool, having nothing to do with him.

    For those who cannot afford private schools for the child markedly defective mentally, there are state institutions, most of which are excellent, where these children are cared for exceptionally well, and given opportunity to learn with other children, and mingle with them happily.

    If I had a child severely handicapped mentally, I would, in case I could use my head, place him in an institution, for his sake and for his family's sake.

    Source: Wisconsin State Journal, September 15, 1944

         Purple Flower

     

     

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