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How to Stay Alive While Boating

Summertime is boating time, and boating can be a lot of fun or it can be a prelude to tragedy if you're not careful. Here are some tips, by Coast Guard experts, on keeping boating safe.

Safe Boating  Panel 1 - Check Boating Equipment
CHECK EQUIPMENT
Oars, oar-locks, the boat itself. Make sure it's in good shape.

Safe Boating  Panel 2 - Learn To Swim
LEARN TO SWIM
if you're planning to go boating or otherwise play around water.

Safe Boating  Panel 3 - Don't Overload Your Boat
DON'T OVERLOAD
Know your boat how many it will carry. Take only that many.

Safe Boating  Panel 4 - Keep In Bounds
KEEP IN BOUNDS
Danger areas are roped off for a purpose. Obey all safety rules.

Safe Boating  Panel 5 - Watch The Weather
WATCH THE WEATHER
The best qualified boaters are at a loss in a bad storm.

Safe Boating  Panel 6 - Avoid Horseplay
AVOID HORSEPLAY
Many deaths annually result from playfully rocking the boat.

Source: The Sedalia Democrat - Sedalia, Missouri - June 18, 1950 - NewspaperARCHIVE.com

1950 - Vacation Tour Of The Month - Pacific Northwest - Greyhound Travel Bureau

SURVEY OF THE DECADES

1950s Family Vacations & Travel

Your Vacation - Helpful Or Harmful
 

 

Your Vacation - Helpful Or Harmful
What is a vacation, anyway? Should it be a rest - or a binge? Experts probed the question for PARADE, came up with thought-provoking answers

FOR MONTHS, their neighbors in a Chicago suburb had been treated to the details of the Browns' planned summer stay at a fabulous seaside resort. No expense was to be spared; it would be a vacation to put all previous vacations in the shade.

Stay Home Family Vacation - Father Resting in Hammock - 1954
STAY HOME: Father gets a rest, but it's no vacation for the rest of the family. Better idea: a few days at home, mixed with a few overnight or one-day automobile trips.

So when the Browns came back after less than a week, it was a neighborhood headline. One by one, the neighbors drifted over to find out what had happened. Mr. Brown, lying in a hammock in the back yard, had a ready explanation. "Why," he asked, "should I pay all that money to be bored when I can be bored cheaper at home?"

That - according to a group of psychologists, psychiatrists, physicians and industrial-health workers interviewed by PARADE - is one of the troubles with vacations. Often, they don't rest you: they beat you unconscious with boredom. The Browns, more forthright than most, faced up to it and came home.

The experts feel vacations fall down in other ways, too. They're often too long, too expensive, too hectic and too much governed by what the Joneses do. Any or all of these can set up a new pattern of emotional tension that may be as damaging as the one the vacationer is trying to leave behind.

Put another way, vacations can be more harmful than helpful. And a bad vacation is worse than none at all, the experts agree.

Source: Albuquerque Journal, PARADE May 30, 1954 - Albuquerque, New Mexico from NewspaperARCHIVE.com

Pepsi Cola - Now It Will Be A Swell Vacation - 1950

 

Divide Vacation Between Your Mate and Children

Every year about this time I receive a few letters from women wanting a discussion of the vacation problem. Should the family take a vacation together, or should the children be left at home while the parents get away for a real rest? Most wives argue in favor of the family vacation, though some of them say their husband claim there really isn't any rest when "the kids are along."

What's the answer? The best one, whenever it can be worked out, is for a couple to divide their vacation time, spending half of it on a family vacation and reserving half of it for the two of them to get away by themselves. This can't always be done and there are women who don't agree that it would be a good idea anyhow.

Here's a comment from one reader who obviously wouldn't think of anything but a family vacation: "We've never taken anything but family vacations and are looking forward to many more years of them." So far so good. But then she says: "In fact I hate to think of the time when Mommie and Daddy will go alone."

SHE IS MISSING AN ADVANTAGE

But that is one advantage when a couple takes a vacation alone now and then. They never forget that the two of them can be happy by themselves. No wife who has enjoyed occasional vacations through the years when she and her husband went off by themselves would dread the years when they would "have" to go alone. That is the best argument for dividing up vacation time—one half for the whole family, one half for just husband and wife. It gives the family the fun of vacationing together and it is also an assurance to the couple that they are still two individuals in their own right. Not just Mommie and Daddy, but a pair of adults who can have a good time with each other.

 

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1959 - Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Patten are vacationing for two weeks in the Virgin Islands.

1959 - Miss Mary Kickery who has been vacationing in California for the past two weeks, returned home on Sunday and has resumed her duties at the Prudential Insurance Co. in Pittsfield

      Purple Flower
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