ReTRo HouSeWiFe

1960's Topics:  1960s Main  1960s Beauty  1960s Children  1960s Cooking  1960s Diets  1960s Fads  1960s Fashion  1960s Home Decor  1960s Home Economics  1960s Housekeeping  1960s Husbands  1960s Romance  1960s Shopping  1960s Vacation 

Other Retro Pages

Economics Club Holds Session

Mrs. Johnny Kennedy gave a demonstration on "Meeting Changes in Family Needs" at a Tuesday afternoon meeting of the Home Economics club in the flower Mound community center.

 During the short business period conducted by Mrs. Leland John, president, reports were heard from the flower committee and 4-H committee. Mrs. Dave Welch led group singing of "The Old Rugged Cross," and members read the qualities of good club members. 1961

SURVEY OF THE DECADES - HOME ECONOMICS

The 1960s Home Economist

Home Economics. I had that in school! We called it "Home Ec" and made fun of it a bit because we were part of the first generation that knew only women's lib and feminism as we came of age. The cry was "Who Needs Men", we can do it ourselves! Housewives were OUT and "Board Room Bitch" was the name of the game!

The 1960s were the last decade where most women grew up thinking they would marry and take their place as "Lady of the House". Toward the end of the decade, bra burning had officially begun. A jiggle that started a ripple that turned into a wave.

But we are getting ahead of ourselves. First let's take a look at the corporation called home, and its CEO, our friend, the housewife.

 

'Working Wife' Makes Changes In Patterns

By SHIRLEY DRINKARD Extension Home Economist Calaway County

The "working wife" becomes more important day by day, and changes our pattern for doing many things.

Have you tried planning a day-time event lately? A coffee? A church meeting? A card party? A club meeting? You, then feel the impact of the "working wife" in our living.

You can still get a good argument going over whether a wife should work, even though more and more wives do.

What would happen if all the working wives suddenly quit their jobs? According to the United States Department of Labor, 16 million wives were in the labor force last year. The labor force would shrink immediately.

Certainly, many households would miss that ready paycheck that has been coming home.

Our poverty programs suggest $3,000 as the poverty line. When the wife works, the number living at the poverty level is greatly decreased.

Besides adding income, the working wife contributes to insurance benefits, college savings, more vacation plans, etc.

The major consideration seems to be as to whether the children have all reached school age.

But if the wife stayed home, she would be worth about $172 weekly. The average American housewife spends about 99 hours a week filling at least 12 different occupations which require intelligence, skill, energy, and patience which pays precisely nothing.

On top of this zero dollar reward she has virtually no chance of a salary, (much less a raise), no assurance of time or duration, or of a vacation and no set schedule for retirement. Of course there are fringe benefits attached to the job of being a housewife - intangible maybe, but of value on which there can and should be no price tag.

This seemingly undesirable "job" is the most sough after in our land- evidenced by increasing number of young marriages. There's no point in trying to get the pay the housewife so obviously deserves. Perhaps we must just appreciate our own worth, and as an economist has said, "don't ask your husband for compensation in cash - he probably couldn't afford you anyway."

FRIDAY MORNING, JULY 28, 1967 - Daily Capital News, Jefferson City, Missouri

 

 

 

1967 Hints From Heloise
Heloise Was There To Help..

Although the problems housewives faced were a bit different...Here is an example taken from a 1967 Heloise column:

***

Dear Heloise:

Most wall-type bathroom heaters have only to or three little bars across the front to protect clothes from catching fire. But with the flimsy gowns of today, it is not enough.

To correct this, remove the front panel of the heater and fit some heavy wire screen across the metal frame. Replace the panel and punch one small hole in the screen to insert the match for lighting. On some heaters, the screen can be molded to fit on the outside of the protecting panel.

The same idea applies to some panel ray-type heaters.

Being a doctor's daughter, I have seen too many people burned when this inexpensive method could have prevented such horror.

Betsy Lees

      Purple Flower

 

 

© Copyright Retro Housewife 2003-2010