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DIETING INTERNATIONALLY PART duex (2)

Musings on an International Scale

I think dieting in some countries must be easier than dieting in others. Here in America, the dieting industry is in the billion dollar arena. Does it really behoove all those costly dieting techniques and programs to make a thin America? If we become thin, then they are out of one very lucrative job.

I think the fact that Americans are obsessing about calories and percentage of fat and carbohydrates shows we are off on the wrong fat foot. For instance, in Germany one cannot find low fat Yogurt. Germans cook using food that will actually spoil, meaning there are no 12 syllable ingredients. They have very small refrigerators and three weeks of food will simply not fit. One has to go shopping fairly often to keep a family of four eating.

Right away, Germans are more active physically, just due to shopping. Then take into account the fact that most people walk at least part of the way to the store. One thing about this broad country of ours it that it is very conducive to walking the three feet from your front step to your car, then driving to a mega mart where everything under the sun is available, then idling the car for five minutes so as to get a parking spot close to the entrance, lest we break out in a dewy sweat.

I imagine England must have some of Germanyís dieting perks, but must have some of the American fastĖfood-is-good-food mentality since the Brits felt it necessary to export their own Fabulous Fattie Fergie to do commercials for the U.S.A. Ex-Princess Fergie has gotten more people to jump on the weight loss wagon than Twiggy introduced to bulimia.

Maybe we could send Bill Clinton overseas for a spell to do some Public Awareness Ads for marriage counseling.

Remember Oprah and her little red wagon of fat? It makes me wish she were a Brit so she could have dropped Ďseven stonesí on the floor so help us visualize. How much is a stone, anyhow? And I donít want to know in grams or any ridiculously metric measure. I want the facts in poundage! I could be much less overweight if I just moved across the pond. England is notorious for having bad food, e.g. chips (French fries) and eggs for breakfast. I'm surprised anyone is overweight there at all, on ole Alpo Island.

I can relate to the Canadians a bit better, because I know some of them speak French and therefore must have lots of buttery baked goods, and creamy sauces. Iíll admit that the practice of putting gravy on their French fries is much less nauseating than the English dipping them in mayonnaise.

(Lucky is the country that knows not mayonnaise! We can thank the French for that one!)

In Germany they butter their bread before adding the Shinken (kind of like bacon). I donít think they dip their fries into anything but their mouths. Thank god I donít have to worry about beaver tail cravings, because all that brings to mind when I hear the words beavertail is really cruel hunters who should be mauled by a moose. Evidently, a beaver tail is a maple cookie of some type, that really couldnít be that great or we would be eating them here.

(Think tiramisu; it was good enough to jump the Atlantic, but beaver tails canít even cross the border.)

America is so concerned with making its food LITE that we havenít noticed the thinner nations who would never take the calories out of their beer. Something in this equation is wrong, and I donít think Susanne Somers has the answers.
 

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